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Posts tagged ‘Nature Conservancy’

16
Jul

Executive Compensation at the Nature Conservancy (2017)

The Nature Conservancy, a non-profit 501 (c) (3) based in Arlington, Virginia whose purpose is to conserve water and land, continues to spend less than the organization raises (in 2017, $1.2 billion in revenue – a 20% increase over 2016 – while only $900 million in expenses were reported (they basically spent $77 out of every $100 in revenue reported) and grow the endowment which increased from $6.2 billion at the beginning of the year to $6.6 billion at year-end while increasing staff (in 2015, the organization reported having 3,875 employees while in 2017, the Nature Conservancy reported having 4,099 employees). Read more »

1
Feb

Fundraising and the Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy raised $914 million (including $627 million in contributions, $130 million in fees and sales, $50 million in investment income and gains, and $102 million in government grants) and spent $796 million (not including depreciation) in the year ending June 30, 2016.  With nearly $6 billion in net fund assets Рmost of which is unrestricted Рthe Nature Conservancy has successfully raised a lot of revenue and retained a significant portion.

The IRS Form 990 (2015) reflecting the year beginning July 1, 2015 and ending June 30, 2016 indicates the Nature Conservancy spent $109 million (or roughly 12% of revenue) on fundraising expenses: Read more »

20
Jan

Where Does $100 to the Nature Conservancy Go?

The Nature Conservancy raises nearly a billion dollars a year and has close to $6 billion in their net fund assets, making the organization one of the most well capitalized non-profits in the country. If you’ve ever wondered how a donation is spent but don’t feel inclined to read the dozens and dozens of pages of the IRS Form 990 (the tax return submitted to the IRS annually), then continue reading. Read more »

12
Jan

Executive Salaries at the Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy – a 501 (c) (3) based in Arlington, Virginia – whose mission is “to conserve land and waters on which all life depends” has been around since 1951 and is one of the most popular and wealthy non-profits in the country.

The most recent financial information (the 2015 IRS Form 990 for the year ending June 30, 2016) reports the organization raised $914 million and spent $810 million. Although it appears the organization could have added $104 million to their net fund assets, these unspent funds were used to offset unrealized losses on investments. Consequently, the Nature Conservancy’s net fund assets remained virtually unchanged at year-end at $5.9 billion. Read more »