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29
Apr

Where Does $100 to the V Foundation Go?

The V Foundation was founded by Jim Valvano, the legendary basketball coach who died in 1993 when he was 47 years old. Based in Cary, North Carolina, the V Foundation was established to raise funds for cancer research so the organization engages in primarily two functions:  fundraising and awarding grants.  However, it is also important to note that an affiliate organization – Don’t Ever Give Up, Inc. – a non-profit 501 (c) (3) – that operates out of the same office – exists to raise funds for the V Foundation.

It is unclear why Don’t Ever Give Up, Inc. was established (in 2015) to raise funds when one of the two purposes of the V Foundation is to raise funds.  Sometimes non-profits form an affiliate organization to focus solely on fundraising so that the primary organization’s fundraising costs appear lower than what they actually are.  To fully understand the V Foundation, it is necessary to look at the IRS Form 990’s of BOTH organizations. If both organizations were considered collectively (since Don’t Ever Give Up, Inc. exists to support the V Foundation), then a more accurate picture of revenue and expenses are revealed. Read more »

27
Apr

Executive Compensation at the Breast Cancer Research Foundation

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) is primarily engaged in raising funds and making grants to further medical research to prevent and cure breast cancer.  With 51 employees, BCRF is based in New York City. In 2017, the organization raised $73 million and awarded $59 million in grants, which is about 80% of revenue. BCRF has about $22 million in net fund assets, most of which is unrestricted.

Total compensation-related costs were $6.7 million for the 51 employees, which equates to about $131,000 each. However, 14 individuals received more than $100,000 in total compensation with the most highly compensated individuals listed below: Read more »

25
Apr

Where Does $100 to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation Go?

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) was founded in 1993 as an independent, not-for-profit 501 (c) (3) dedicated to preventing and curing breast cancer by supporting scientific research. Consequently, the organization engages in primarily two functions: raising funds and awarding grants.  Based in New York, BCRF has about 51 employees dedicated to these functions and managing the organization. So, the key question becomes:  just how much of the revenue raised was awarded in grants? About 80%, according to the most recent financial information.

The Form 990 (2016 representing the year beginning July 1, 2016 and ending June 30, 2017) for BCRF reports the following key information with regards to revenue and expenses, grants, assets and liabilities, and fundraising. Read more »

23
Apr

Executive Compensation at Donors Choose

Donors Choose is a New York City-based 501 (c) (3) non-profit that connects the public to projects that need funding in public schools.

Founded in 2000 by a history teacher, Charles Best, Donors Choose asks public school staff to post projects that need funding so that the public can choose what they want to help pay for by making a donation. In 2016, the organization raised $121 million, spent $101 million with the remainder added to the net fund assets which had nearly $61 million at year-end.

Donors Choose reported having 199 employees in 2016 but about 40% of these employees were part-time or seasonal workers. At year-end (June 30, 2017) there were 118 full-time employees, 22 of whom received more than $100,000 in compensation with the most highly compensated individuals listed below: Read more »

21
Apr

Where Does $100 to Donors Choose Go?

Donors Choose is a New York City-based 501 (c) (3) non-profit that connects the public to projects that need funding in public schools. Founded in 2000 by a history teacher, Charles Best, Donors Choose asks public school staff to post projects that need funding so that the public can choose what they want to help pay for via their donations (along with a suggested 18-20% donation to the organization (that covers program, management, and fundraising costs although the organization states the reason is to help Donors Choose reach more classrooms) and a $30 fulfillment labor and materials cost and a “third-party processing fee” that goes to Donors Choose to help cover program costs. The process sounds very simple but the From 990 submitted by Donors Choose to the IRS shows the collection and disbursement of revenue is a bit more complicated. Read more »

19
Apr

Executive Compensation at Autism Speaks

Autism Speaks is a New York City based non-profit organization that raises about $50 million a year. With a focus on advocacy and support for individuals and families affected by autism, Autism Speaks spends about $45 out of every $100 on compensation related expenses.

In 2016, Autism Speaks spent $21.5 million on compensation-related expenses and $10 million on fees for services outside the organization.  The $21.5 million was used to compensate 263 individuals which equates to $82,000 each although 49 individuals received more than $100,000 in compensation.  The most 13 highly compensated individuals were: Read more »

17
Apr

Where Does $100 to Autism Speaks Go?

Autism Speaks – a New York City based non-profit 501 (c) (3) – has come under fire over the past few years for a variety of reasons not least of which is how the organization spends revenue. With 263 employees (in 2016), 49 of whom earn more than $100,000 annually, Autism Speaks is not an organization focused on “curing” autism by awarding research grants (although the organization spent about $7.4 million or 15% of revenue on grants, of which $4.4 million in grants were awarded for science and research grants while $3 million was spent on family services and fellowships). Instead, Autism Speaks is a labor intensive organization working to enhance the lives of those afflicted with autism and their families through advocacy and support. Read more »

15
Apr

Executive Compensation at the ASPCA

The ASPCA is a New York-based non-profit that raises about $200 million a year and has about $230 million in net fund assets. With 1,177 employees that cost the organization nearly $80 million a year (an average of $68,000 each), the ASPCA focuses on animal welfare.

The IRS Form 990 (2016) reports that 161 individuals received more than $100,000 in compensation with the 15 most highly compensated individuals listed below: Read more »

13
Apr

How is Revenue Spent at the ASPCA?

The ASPCA is one of the most widely recognized non-profits focused on animal welfare in the country.  Founded in 1866, the ASPCA has been around for more than 150 years.  As is the case with most non-profits, the issue isn’t whether the ASPCA does good things (they do) but  whether they could do more or better with the public support they receive.

The Form 990 (2016) submitted to the IRS reveals the following key information about the ASPCA including Revenue and Expenses, Assets and Liabilities, Independent Contractors, and Fundraising: Read more »

11
Apr

Moby: “Food Stamps Shouldn’t Pay for Junk”

I have a love-hate relationship with the Wall Street Journal. One of the most respected newspapers in the world, the Wall Street Journal was my go-to newspaper for decades but since Murdoch bought the paper in 2007, I’ve reluctantly embraced it.

The news and personal lifestyle information is always interesting while the editorials often frustrate me with their conservative, big brother take on politics and culture.  But not yesterday when an editorial entitled Food Stamps Shouldn’t Pay for Junk by Moby was printed. Read more »