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Posts tagged ‘Owen’

12
Jun

Waiting

Books are often the first exposure to art that children have. Keeping that in mind urges me to make the very best books possible. I know how important the books from my childhood were (and are) to me. Without them, I might not be a writer and artist today.                                    ~Kevin Henkes

There are books that stay with us for a lifetime even if we only had the pleasure of discovering their magic as adults reading to children.  If you’re a parent, there is a high probability at least one book written by Kevin Henkes is on your child’s bookshelf. A contemporary writer of children’s books, Henkes is the author of more than a dozen titles including Wemberly WorriedJulius The Baby of the World, Sheila Rae, the Brave, Chester’s Way, A Weekend with Wendell, Owen,  Chrysanthemum, Lilly’s Big Day, Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse, and Waiting, a Caldecott Honor Book published in 2015. Read more »

20
Feb

Bariatric Surgery for Kids?

The Wall Street Journal ran an article this week entitled “As World’s Kids Get Fatter, Doctors Turn to the Knife” by Shirley S. Wang who reported that children as young as 3 years old are being considered for weight-loss surgery in Saudi Arabia. Seems that the rates of overweight and obese children age 5 and under are rising in much of the world but rising faster in developed countries, including Saudi Arabia. Why? That’s the million dollar question with the answer alarmingly apparent. Read more »

3
Oct

The Right Gift For Kids: On-Line Resources

Finding the right gift for a child is sometimes harder than choosing a gift for an adult as children are always changing so the fascination with a toy, game, or book can be fleeting. To complicate matters more, each child is different so focusing on the age of the child and his or her interests will serve as a guide in choosing the right gift. Read more »
19
Jul

Children’s Books To Be Treasured

Last month my 15-year old daughter asked me if we could update the playroom in our home. She told me she had outgrown the room and wants it to be more mature….”like for teenagers” is how she phrased it.  I knew this day was coming but still it’s hard to believe the games, toys, and books that defined her childhood are no longer relevant:  the classic wooden blocks that haven’t been used in years, or the “Pretty Pretty Princess” game which was more than likely last used in 2004 when she convinced her three male cousins (ages 9,7, and 6) to play; or the books that I’ve spent thousands of hours reading to her.  They are as much a part of my journey as hers.  She’s just ready to move on while I’m still holding on. Read more »